2/9/21: PRIMROSE PATHOLOGY III – FULL MENTAL RACKET W/ DR. JASON WEST

However, I presented a show entitled Primrose Pathology where I warned of how a fungus that does not respond to medicines may trigger an even deadlier pandemic.

In a follow up show called Primrose Pathology II,  I explained that 5G technology aggravated “Candida Auris” and that while COVID-19 is not affected by 5G — fungus capable of triggering immune responses that leave you susceptible to it can be,

It is also coincidental that the warning about “Candida Auris” has been reported as a real threat at the same time as COVID-19 variants emerge.

It turns out that the case for the variants’ contagiousness and dangerousness centers largely on the theoretical effects of just one change said to stem from a mutation in the virus’s genes.

Last year, there was report that a COVID-19 variant strain was found in Ahmedabad, India that triggered Mucormycosis, a type of fungal disease which infects those with compromised immune systems, and with other existing diseases, is a serious infection with a mortality rate of nearly 50 per cent.

Symptoms depend on where in the body the fungus is growing. If the growth is on the sinus and brain region, symptoms can include one-sided facial swelling, headache, nasal or sinus congestion, black lesions on nasal bridge or upper inside of mouth that quickly become more severe and fever.

If in the lung, symptoms may include fever, cough, chest pain and shortness of breath. Skin mucormycosis can look like blisters or ulcers and the infected area may turn black. Gastrointestinal mucormycosis may be indicated by abdominal pain, vomiting and gastrointestinal bleeding.

While the new variants of COVID-19 that have been reported recently have not been connected to various fungal anomalies — their new nomenclatures are certainly scary sounding and many of the variant research is still a little nebulous.

USA Today reported that now a British researcher recently suggested that two new COVID-19 symptoms “COVID tongue” and mouth ulcers — may need to be added to health officials’ lists of coronavirus symptoms.

Tim Spector, a professor of genetic epidemiology at King’s College London, said 1 in 5 people are showing these less common symptoms of COVID-19, which also don’t appear on guidelines or lists from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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